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  • Writer's pictureJames Haddock

I'm taking a poll


I’m taking a poll. I’ve started a blog on my web site (jameshaddock.us), but I wanted it to be more than saying I am writing a new book. I’m always writing a new book (wake me when you have something new to say). Neither did I want to just fill space saying; I just refilled the bird feeder. Or, I’m training my neighbors horse to come to me when I whistle (which is true), so when the EMP attack happens (may not be true, but…) I’ll have a ride out of town. You get the idea.

So, here is my poll question: What do you wish your parents (and/or Grandparents) had taught you when you were growing up?

Most things we learned from them, was by watching them. Actions speak louder than words (getting pinched for being too loud in church reinforced the lesson). Manners, interactions with others, hunting, planting a garden, driving, etc. The thing that stands out most for me is finance, business, and wealth building. Of course, I understand why, we weren’t rich. My father was career military, my mother career nurse. Their best advice offered was get a good education and put money away for retirement. Good advice as far as it went.

I gave my kids the same advice. That was the best I had to offer at the time. Now I have better advice and I want to pass it along to them, and my grand-kids, and great grand-kids. I plan to be hanging around for a long time, I can’t think of a better way to spend my time.

With your help, I’ll try to post some helpful lessons, information, tips, that we can pass on to our kids and beyond. What do you wish your parents (and/or Grandparents) had taught you when you were growing up?

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6 Comments


George Lord
George Lord
Nov 29, 2020

My Grandparents used to say "finish what you started" if we don't finish we never know if we are successful or not. Whether it is a fight or a dream we are working toward we need to finish.

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Clyde Wheeler
Clyde Wheeler
Jun 11, 2020

I remember my Dad always telling what he was taught by his Father, "If you don't have anything good to say about someone then don't say anything at all" so I was always a quiet person growing up respecting my betters.

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Steve Booth
Steve Booth
Apr 13, 2020

I think that value of being kind is incredibly underrated. My parents were good folks, teachers. I learned about saving money from them and social skills from my mother. Practicing these things is incredibly important.


However, Faith is also essential to get you through he hard times which occur in everyone's life. The empathy I've developed from losing my parents and all of my siblings cannot be learned, it must be experienced.

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paulk4268
paulk4268
Nov 23, 2019

Having lived through WWII my parents, like most of their generation, was most concerned with stability, having a relative reliable job, moving deliberately toward retirement. What I wish they had also taught was to recognize that it was possible to also have a "dream" and to set aside time to work toward that dream. It may be something small or it could huge but unless you claim it and accept it, it can never move forward. I believe most people have a shadow dream that they have never claimed. If you do not own it, it can never be more.

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Gary Monroe
Gary Monroe
Oct 07, 2019

How to sail a boat. Self reliance, responsibility, team work and a lot of time together to talk.

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